Defining the Destination

Context
Grade
Unit Duration
Social, Cultural and Historical
Three


Understandings: Essential and Guiding Question:
Everyone is governed by a code of conduct and those codes come out of the times and society we live in.
Knights followed a code of conduct (character traits).
How do codes of conduct reflect the times and culture that we live in?
  • What code of conduct did knights follow?
  • How are codes of conduct the same and different from the times of knights and the times we live in?
  • What codes of conduct come out of the time we live in?
  • What codes of conduct do we follow in our classroom today?
Outcomes: (from the curriculum)
1. INQUIRE Use inquiry to explore authentic problems, questions, and issues associated with identity, social responsibility, and efficacy. p-29 (CC4.2)
2. COMPREHEND & RESPOND Listen and respond to understand information, identify main ideas and supporting details, compare different ideas and points of view, to make connections between texts heard, and explain reactions. p-27
3. COMPOSE & CREATE Create a range of visual, multimedia oral and written texts that explore identity, social responsibility, and efficacy. p-30 (CC4.5)
4. INQUIRE Communicate ideas and information pertaining to a topic by creating easy to follow visual representations with a clear purpose and relevant and logical ideas. p-29 (CC4.2)
5. REFLECT & SET GOALS Reflect on and assess their viewing, listening, reading, representing, speaking, and writing experiences and the selected strategies they have used. p-38 (AR4.1)
Indicators:
Knowledge:
Listening, Reading & Viewing Comprehension

Main and Supporting Ideas
Inquiry Process

Elements of PhotoStory
- storyboard
- pictures
- music
- narration
- transitions between screens
Do:
Listen, read or view purposefully to identify, to compare, to explain reactions, to make connections.

Identify main and supporting ideas.

Record, share, organize, and synthesize understandings from a variety of sources to answer the question.

Create a PhotoStory using the various elements

Self-assess final criteria
Assessment: (for of as)
Performance Task
Create a PhotoStory that includes all
elements and shows a response to the Essential Question
Other Evidence:
Ongoing Journal to record reflections and responses and questions
GRAPHIC ORGANISERS FOR BENCHMARKS
Checklist for PhotoStory process
  • creating a storyboard
  • choosing pictures
  • choosing music
  • narrating
  • creating transitions between screens
Checklist for PhotoStory content
Self-evaluation checklist
Peer-evaluation checklist

Wandering

1. Lesson/Activity Focus: Introducing the Essential Question.
Indicators (KUD): U1
Assessment: Observation
Strategies: Jigsaw
Resources/Materials: Chart paper & Markers

Before: Identify 5 locations (such as: School Library, Church, Swimming Pool, Doctor’s Office, Grocery Store, Hockey Rink, etc.) and record on chart paper. Ask the students to think of how they would behave at these locations. Place students in 5 groups and have them record their behaviours at a location for 3 minutes and then rotate until they have been to all locations.
During: Discuss each location and the behaviours that students identified as appropriate to that location. How did they know how to behave at each location? Was it written down, did someone tell them, or did they just know? Introduce the term codes of conduct and start a chart of various examples from the discussion (such as: respect, honesty, being quiet, cleanliness, etc.). Ask do they change over time or in different locations?
After: Journal what they now know about a code of conduct. Homework assignment: Interview parents, grandparents about the code of conduct they followed when they were in school.
2. Lesson/Activity Focus: What do we know about knights and their code of conduct?
Indicators (KUD): U2, D1
Assessment: Rubric
Strategies: Viewing a video clip & activate student’s background knowledge.
Resources/Materials: A Knight’s Tale

Before: Quick write with a partner things you know about knights. (60 seconds, 30 seconds, 15 seconds, 10, seconds, 10 seconds) Develop the Know of a K-W-L chart.
During: From the K-W-L have them highlight how what they know is related to codes of conduct and develop the What They Want To Know section to include further questions relating to codes of conduct in the time of knights. Watch the video clip and then have each student note 3 things they saw about codes of conduct.
After: Come together as a whole class and discuss what they know to develop the What Is Learned section of the K-W-L chart. Journal what they have learned about a knight’s codes of conduct.
Lesson 2: A Knight's Tale (Video Trailer)


3. Lesson/Activity Focus: Develop the student’s knowledge on knights and their society.
Indicators (KUD): U1, D1, D3
Assessment: Fill in the web organizer.
Strategies: Reading a fiction book
Resources/Materials: Fiction book & A Graphic Organize
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Before: Model with students what we would like future generations to realize about our way of life (such as: food, recreation, transportation, housing, clothing, etc.) using a web graphic organizer (Q-Tasks p-81). Put categories in the circles and examples on the rays.
During: Students brainstorm categories about the knight’s way of life (such as: food, recreation, transportation, weaponry, people, housing, clothing, etc.) and then choose four to put in the circles on their web graphic organizer. Explain to the students that they will be listening for examples of each category to place on the rays. Read the story aloud.
After: Have students choose their favourite piece of information, that they’ve learned about medieval times, and contribute it to a Voice Thread and draw a picture of their favourite category.

Lesson 3:


Knights In Shining Armor by Gail Gibbons. Little, Brown and Company, 1995, ISBN 0-316-30948-6.

VoiceThread
4. Lesson/Activity Focus: Develop the student’s knowledge on knights and their society.
Indicators (KUD): U1, D1, D3
Assessment: Fill in the web organizer.
Strategies: Reading a non-fiction book.
Resources/Materials: Several non-fiction books.

Before: Read a fiction and a non-fiction paragraph about horses to the class. Have students compare and contrast the two readings through discussion (such as: covers, table of contents, pictures, style of print, number of columns, bolding, headings, index).
During: Distribute the webs from lesson 3 and have small group sharing. Have students choose four categories that they would like to learn more about and put them in a new web graphic organizer. Explain how to use a book’s table of contents and index. Distribute non-fiction books to individuals or groups with the same categories. Encourage students to try and use three different books and record the title of each book. Point out to students that they may not find all or any of the information they require in a specific book.
After: Have students choose their new favourite piece of information, that they’ve learned about medieval times, and contribute it to a Voice Thread and write in their journal about whether they would have liked to live in Medieval times.

Lesson 4:


5. Lesson/Activity Focus: Develop the student’s knowledge on knights and their code of conduct.
Indicators (KUD): U2, D1, D2
Assessment: Rubric on the final paragraph for understanding and mechanics.
Strategies: Reading a book and identifying the main and supporting ideas about elements of the knight’s code of conduct. Then have students write about the element to show their understanding of it. Repeat with several stories.
Resources/Materials:

Before: Display p-33 of Adventures in the Middle Ages with blanks for the various elements of the knight’s code of conduct. Brainstorm with the students to fill in the blanks (such as: bravery, protecting the poor and needy, loyalty, courtesy, honesty, gentleness, kindness, generosity, pious)
During: Now read the students “The Knight Who Was Afraid of the Dark” and have students identify the element from the code that the story focused on – Bravery. What did other people see as brave? What did knights in the story do that was brave? What did he do that was brave?
“The Paper Bag Princess” deals with protecting the poor and needy.
“Shrek” (video) deals with kindness/gentleness.
After: Have students write about each element of the code of conduct. (such as: Bravery is …) Teacher will monitor these entries for understanding.
After several stories have the students write a paragraph on “This is what I think a code of conduct for a good knight should be . . .” (If your were the king or queen this is what your knights would be like.)

Lesson 5:
Adventures in the Middle Ages by Linda Bailey
Published by Kids Can Press, 2000. ISBN 1-55074-540-9 (pbk.)



The Knight Who Was Afraid of the Dark by Barbara Shook Hazen
Published by Dial Books for Young Readers, 1989. ISBN 014-054545-X

The Paper Bag Princess by Robert N. Munsch
Published by Annick Press Ltd, 1980. ISBN 0-920236-16-2 (pa.)

Shrek Video Clips to the song "Can You Feel the Love Tonight"

Shrek Trailer for the First Movie


6. Lesson/Activity Focus: Exploring knowledge about current codes of conduct.
Indicators (KUD): U1
Assessment: Observation
Strategies: Identify codes of conduct in current organizations and compare and contrast to the knight’s code of conduct.
Resources/Materials: Codes of Conduct from 4-H, Class Chart

Before: Discuss with the students: You now know what a knight’s code of conduct looks like. Why did they have a code of conduct? Why did they need to be brave?
During: Today we have codes of conduct for many groups. Start a wall chart with knights and one other group with a specific code and one with an unwritten code (such as: 4-H & church). Discuss - Why do they need a code of conduct? Why is it important? How is it the same or different from the knight’s code? Explain that some codes are very specific such as 4-H that is learned by reading it and some are unwritten such as family or going to church that are learned by doing it.
After: As an assignment have students investigate another code of conduct or bring in a visitor to share a particular code of conduct (such as - 4-H, Brownies, Dance, Hockey, Family, Music Lessons, Skating, School, Legion, Karate), compare and contrast them to medieval times, add a fourth column to a personal sized chart.

Lesson 6

Saskatchewan 4-H Website

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[file:l64Hpledge.doc]]

7. Lesson/Activity Focus: Exploring knowledge about current codes of conduct.
Indicators (KUD): U1
Assessment: Observation
Strategies: Teacher Narrative & Discussion
Resources/Materials: Journals, Class Chart

Before: Teacher Narrative - Why does the 4-H need a code of conduct?
During: Discuss the unwritten codes of conduct with the students. Why is it important to be quiet in church?
After: The students write about the code of conduct that they investigated in lesson 6 and why it is important.
8. Lesson/Activity Focus: Exploring knowledge about our classroom code of conduct.
Indicators (KUD): U1
Assessment: Rubric, Observation
Strategies: Role Play, Discussion, T-Charts
Resources/Materials: Journals, Class Chart

Before: Role Play – Have the teacher or older student act against the code of conduct for the classroom (such as chew gum, wear a hat, be rude, yell, lose things in a messy desk, etc.) In partners write down what just happened and why it was different to the normal routine. Have the pairs each share one thing they wrote down that hasn’t been said already about the incident.
During: Have students write down the code of conduct for our classroom. Discuss these ideas as a class and link them to the classroom rules/code of conduct. Do a T-chart example and then have students work in pairs on T-charts to compare different elements of codes of conduct.
For example if they chose BRAVERY the students might say a Knight shows this by killing a dragon or jousting and a Student shows this by taking a risk or standing up to a bully.
Post the charts and have students present them. (such as: half stand by charts and present to other half in small groups)
After: Go back and reread journal entries and then make your own personal code of conduct that contains 5 elements and is presented in a list form.

Lesson 8




Arrival:

Sharing the Ideas and Information:
Performance task creation - Make a PhotoStory
Social action – Reflects the code of conduct in our times & culture.
LESSON where we create photo story

Lesson/Activity Focus: Create a PhotoStory
Indicators (KUD):
Assessment: Rubric
Strategies:Demonstration
Resources/Materials: PhotoStory How to Video, Storyboard, Images

Before: Watch a sample PhotoStory on the Knight's Code of Conduct
During: Create a storyboard and then create a PhotoStory on their own personal Code of Conduct
After: Post their PhotoStory, view other Student's PhotoStories, make comments on the other student's PhotoStories


PhotoStory



Knight Coloring Pages

Understandings:

Knights followed a code of honour (character traits).
Society existed in class levels.
History: buildings (castles), clothing, food, etc.

All through history we have been governed by a code of conduct and even today we are governed by code of conducts.
How are our character traits based on this code of conduct.
Everyone is governed by a code of conduct and those codes come out of the times and society we live in.

Essential & Guiding Questions:


How do codes of conduct reflect the times and culture that we live in?
  • What codes of conduct come out of the time we live in?
  • What codes of conduct do we follow in our classroom today?
  • Do we have codes of honour?
  • Are our codes based on class levels of society?
  • How do past codes of conducts affect today's codes of conduct? history

How are codes of conduct the same and different from the times of knights and the times we live in?

Outcomes:



1. INQUIRE Use inquiry to explore authentic problems, questions, and issues associated with identity, social responsibility, and efficacy. p-29
2. COMPREHEND & RESPOND Listen and respond to understand information, identify main ideas and supporting details, compare different ideas and points of view, to make connections between texts heard, and explain reactions.
p-27
3. COMPOSE & CREATE Create a range of visual, multimedia oral and written texts that explore identity, social responsibility, and efficacy. p-30
4. INQUIRE Communicate ideas and information pertaining to a topic by creating easy to follow visual respresentations with a clear purpose and relevant and logical ideas. p-29


5. REFLECT & SET GOALS Reflect on an assess their viewing, listening, reading, representing, speaking, and writing experiences and the selected strategies they have used. p-38

Indicators:

2. Listen purposefully to understand information and identify main ideas and supporting ideas.
Listen to compare different ideas and points of view.
Explain reactions and make connections to texts they hear.

1. Use an inquiry process to explore a topic.
Record and share personal knowledge and understanding of the topic.
Use a variety of sources.
Determine main ideas that will inform inquiry questions.
Organzie and record understandings, ideas and information using a variety of strategies.
Determine whether ideas and information collected is sufficient or adequate for established purpose.
Self- assess inquiry experience.

4. Share and report what was learned in an easy-to-follow visual, oral, and written format.

3. Use words, symbols, and other media, including appropriate technology, to express understanding of topics, themes, and issues related to identity and social responsiblity.
Create a range of visual, multimedia, oral and written texts that expore identity and social responsibility.

5. Reflect, with guidance, on viewing, listening, reading representing, speaking, and writing by explaining what is effective, is liked, in a presentation.

VERBS
NOUNS

2 Reflecting
1 Collected
5 Self-assess
2 Share
2 Report
2 Express
6 Create
1 Listen
2 Understand
1 Identify
4 Compare
2 Explain
4 Make connections
3 Use
2 Explore
1 Record
4 Determine
  • Number are Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy


Viewing
Listening
Reading
Representing
Speaking
Writing
Effective (Liked)
Presentation
Purpose
Inquiry Experience
Learned
Format
Words
Symbols
Media
Appropriate Technology
Themes
Issues
Identity
Social Responsibility
Range
Visual
Oral & Written Texts
Multimedia
Information
Main Ideas
Supporting Ideas
Points of View
Reactions
Text
Inquiry Process
Topics
Personal Knowledge
Understandings
Variety of Sources
Inquiry Questions
Ideas
Information
Strategies
Sufficient
Adequate



Knowledge
Key Elements of Listening
Main and Supporting Ideas
Do
Listen purposefully to identify, to compare, to explain reactions, to make connections.
Inquiry Process
Elements of Presentation
Information comes in a variety of forms

Elements of Photo Story
Record, share, organize, synthesize understandings from a variety of sources
Self-assess final criteria

Photostory Skills
- storyboard
- choose pictures
- choose music
- narrate
- transistions between screens

ASSESSMENT
Authenic Performance Tasks
Create a PhotoStory presentation which reflects their understanding of codes of conduct.
Self-assessment checklist.
Rubric for PhotoStory elements.
Rubric for PhotoStory content.
Peer assessment journal entry/checklist. (Two stars and a wish)
Benchmark - Graphic organizers for main ideas/supporting ideas (Venn Diagram ... then and now).

WANDERING

Motivational Set:
What do they know? KWL Chart
Visual of knight on horse (A Knight's Tale) - write down at least five things you know
Come together and do a big KWL chart together.
Choose one piece of ficitonal writing to have them read to spark knowledge and new questions.
ie: Q-tasks p-80
Choose one piece of non-fiction writing.
Or Interview a knight - what 3 questions would you ask

Resources:
Movies
A Knight's Tale
Enchanted
Ever After

Books:
The Whipping Boy

Teacher Books: Information Transformation

What information search skills do the students need to know?
Library catalog
Internet Search within a personalised Google Search
Judging information & its validity
Create a PhotoStory
Digital Camera skills

Knight on the Hot Seat (similar to Sherron's Macbeth example)

Introduce codes of conduct - bravery, respect - discuss how the knights handled this - show students where you found the info as you go.
Then have students take the knowledge they've learned about respect in the time of knights and link it to now - what do we do today? Where do we get our code of conduct from? Laws, Bible, etc. Use this info to develop a code of conduct for the classroom.
Tournaments & Jousts - certain ettiquette expected. Castles may not be included except for the behaviour needed within the castle.